TRX Workout Plan for Beginners

0
54

Sharing a total body TRX workout plan for beginners. As always, talk with a doctor before making any fitness changes and modify as needed!

Hi friends! How’s the day going? I’m hopping in between training clients today and looking forward to Taco Tuesday later tonight. Any day that ends with chips and a ‘rita is a friend of mine, indeed.

For today’s post, I’m sharing a TRX workout plan for beginners! As you guys know, I’m a huge fan of the TRX suspension trainer and it’s been a staple in my workout routine for years. What is the TRX? TRX stands for Total Body Resistance Exercise and was developed by Navy SEAL Randy Hetrick. He was deployed and wanted to create something that he could easily use for resistance training. He created the first prototype for the TRX using a jiu jitsu belt! You can read more about his fascinating story and journey here.

TRX Workout Plan for Beginners 1

TRX suspension training uses gravity for resistance, which means that you’re using your own body weight. However, your distance from the anchor point of the TRX can make an exercise easier or exponentially more challenging. You also may find that the TRX enables you to find more range of motion, support, or resistance for your workout; depending on your fitness level and body position.

The TRX is also super lightweight and portable, so it’s an awesome home workout tool or travel workout companion. 🙂

TRX Workout Plan for Beginners 2

Use can use the TRX system to train your entire body, and it’s easy to modify or advance, depending on your personal level. This style of training helps to improve strength and endurance, and is generally a safe and effective tool to use. Today, I’m sharing a TRX workout plan that’s designed for beginners, but keep in mind that a simple shift if your position can make this harder for my advanced friends out there.

 

TRX Workout Plan for Beginners

This workout is a circuit-based workout, meaning that you’ll go down the list of exercises. You’ll complete 12-15 reps of the first exercise, move onto the second, then the third, etc. until you reach the end of the circuit. You’ll rest for 60-90 seconds and complete the circuit 1-2 more times through.

What makes this a beginner workout?

Typically for beginners, I’ll start with lower weights and higher rep exercises. We don’t lift super heavy initially, because anything *new* we’re doing is going to make them sore. I never want clients or participants to be debilitatingly sore. That is the prefect way to crush any hope of consistency! You can’t workout if you feel too sore to walk around the house, ya know?

The TRX is PERFECT because you can adjust your stance to increase the resistance. Beginner friends may be a little closer to the anchor point for pushing movements and farther away for pulling movements. I’ll share some tips below.

My biggest tip for the TRX: you’re in a moving plank for SO many of the exercises. Be sure to think about your alignment (keeping your hips, shoulders, and ankles in a nice line with your core supported, pull your shoulders down away from your ears, and BREATHE. To see the TRX in action, here’s a TRX video I put together with some of my favorite exercises.

How often should I complete this workout?

This is a total-body circuit, so I would do this 2-3 times per week on non-consecutive days. If you’re not currently strength training, start with 1 day per week and add on from here. I would walk the remaining days and be sure to include 1-2 days of rest/recovery each week.

Remember that while I’m a certified personal trainer, I’m just sharing info and recommend meeting with someone 1:1 to determine your best workout plan. As always, make sure to talk to a doctor before making any fitness changes. Modify as needed.

TRX Workout Plan for Beginners 3

The exercises:

Assisted squat and narrow row

Face towards the anchor point and extend your arms out so they’re straight out front from your shoulders. Step your feet so they’re shoulder width and toes slightly turned out. Sink back and down into your squat and as you come up, squeeze your elbows in towards your torso (narrow row). Video example here.

Alternating lunge

Face towards the anchor point and extend your arms out so they’re straight out front from your shoulders. Step one foot back and sink down so both knees are close to 90 degrees (try to keep your front knee stacked above your front ankle). Alternate and perform 10 on each side. Video example here.

Wide row

Face towards the anchor point and extend your arms out so they’re straight out from your shoulders. Keep that moving plank alignment in mind as you lean back and keep your feet hip width. Bend your elbows out to the side 90 degrees and with control come back to your start position. You should feel this in your upper back. If it’s too hard, step farther away from the anchor point. Too easy? Step closer. This is one of my favorite upper body exercises. Video example here.

Biceps curl

Face towards the anchor point and extend your arms out so they’re straight out from your shoulders. Keep that moving plank alignment in mind as you lean back. Bend your arms (palms face up) and with control, lower back to your starting position. You should feel this in your biceps. If it’s too hard, step farther away from the anchor point. Too easy? Step closer. Video example here.

Chest press

Face away from the anchor point and bring your arms straight out from your shoulders. Bend your elbows out to the sides 90 degrees, bringing your torso down, then exhale and squeeze your chest to push back to a start position. Video example here.

Triceps extension

You’ll face away from the anchor point and bring your arms straight overhead. Walk your feet in until there’s no more *slack* in the TRX. Keep your elbows framing your face and bend your elbows to 90 degrees, then extend straight. Keep your shoulders and ribs down. Video example here.

Mountain climbers

Face away from the anchor point and bring your elbows in close to your body. Walk your feet in towards the anchor point so your torso is at more of a 45 degree angle from the ground. Alternate driving each knee in towards your chest. You can do this slowly, or more quickly. Make sure to keep control of your core and breathe. Video example here (his arms are straight; I’d prefer if you kept your arms bent and close to your torso.)

TRX plank

This is a great exercise to work on core stability. You’ll face away from the anchor point, hold your arms straight out from your shoulders and walk your feet in until you start to feel tension in your core. Keep your core pulled in, shoulders down, and breathe. More advanced version: perform a traditional plank position (hands on the floor, feet in the straps) and keep your core pulled in and breathe. Video example here.

So, tell me, friends: do you love the TRX, too? What’s your favorite exercise?

I love any core work using the TRX and also single-leg exercises, like pistol squats and single-leg lunges.

xoxo

Gina

Not sure how to put all of your workouts together? Check out this free download on how to schedule your week + check out Fit Team here!

More TRX workouts:

At-home TRX total body workout

Total Body TRX Circuit

The best TRX exercises

TRX superset workout

TRX kettlebell circuit

The post TRX Workout Plan for Beginners appeared first on The Fitnessista.